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CURRENT OPHTHALMOLOGY
Year : 2007  |  Volume : 55  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 251-260

Amniotic membrane transplantation: A review of current indications in the management of ophthalmic disorders


1 Cornea and Anterior Segment Services, LV Prasad Eye Institute, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad, India
2 Cornea and Anterior Segment Services, LV Prasad Eye Institute, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad, India; Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK
3 Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA
4 Orbit, Oculoplastic and Ocular oncology service, LVPEI, Hyderabad, India; Moorfields Eye Hospital, London, UK

Correspondence Address:
Virender S Sangwan
LV Prasad Eye Institute, LV Prasad Marg, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad - 500 034, India

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0301-4738.33036

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Amniotic membrane transplantation is currently being used for a continuously widening spectrum of ophthalmic indications. It has gained widespread attention as an effective method of reconstruction of the ocular surface. Amniotic membrane has a unique combination of properties, including the facilitation of migration of epithelial cells, the reinforcement of basal cellular adhesion and the encouragement of epithelial differentiation. Its ability to modulate stromal scarring and its anti-inflammatory activity has led to its use in the treatment of ocular surface pathology as well as an adjunct to limbal stem cell grafts. Amniotic membrane transplantation has been used for reconstruction of the corneal surface in the setting of persistent epithelial defects, partial limbal stem cell deficiency, bullous keratopathy and corneoscleral ulcers. It has also been used in conjunction with limbal stem cell transplantation for total limbal stem cell deficiency. Amniotic membrane grafts have been effectively used as a conjunctival substitute for reconstruction of conjunctival defects following removal of pterygia, conjunctival lesions and symblephara. More recently, amniotic membrane has been used as a substrate for ex vivo cultivation of limbal, corneal and conjunctival epithelial cells. This article reviews the current literature on the applications of amniotic membrane transplantation and its outcome in various ophthalmic conditions.


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